Rida Jannat

Rida Jannat

She is 22 years old final-year medical student at Ameer-ud-Din Medical College, Lahore. She is an avid reader. She loves baking and is emotionally attached to chocolate. She aspires to become a psychiatrist one day.
Rida Jannat
My younger brother is usually my go-to person when I need a suggestion for a good show to watch or if I desperately need an up gradation of my music playlist. I trust his choice; well at least most of the times that is. But I am not that easy to be convinced and we usually end up arguing about it with me purposely telling him how lame his taste in such matters is. And he, determined & considering it his moral obligation to recommend worthy shows/movies/music to me, insists that I watch it too so we could share our mutual views about it afterward.
This time, however, he gave me no fanciful introduction, there was no arguing, trolling or the usual blame-game about who insisted on some not so good show or song in the past. No, that day he just gave me a rather grave look and said you better watch this. No amount of persuasion would bring him round to telling me something, anything about the screenplay, cast or the story in general. He wanted my opinion on it, pure and unbiased. So you can well imagine my curiosity, and that is how I ended up watching 13 Reasons Why.
I watched the first episode, then the second. But then I could no longer bring myself to binge watch it just like I did with the rest of the shows. It took me time to digest it, make my mind used to the fact that the leading protagonist was already dead in the rest of the serial. Dead girl talking about why and who exactly led to the events compelling her to take her own life. 13 reasons to be exact.
While I was watching the show I came across a lot of negative reviews about the show on social media, all the while having ratings that were over the roof. I read about how people thought that that the show was overhyped, that Hannah took her life to get that spotlight she so badly craved while she was still alive. That there is always a ‘saner’ alternative to suicide and that it is always a matter of choice. Suicide is for the weak and the retarded, bla bla…
Let us suppose for argument’s sake that Hannah is all that, let’s just ignore the fact that she was a mere 17-year-old who just couldn’t deal with all that on repeat bullying, slut-shaming and assaults, all the while having no friends to ventilate it over with. But wait, we are missing out on this teeny tiny detail on which, I think, the whole concept of the book-turned-to-show is based: that depression and mental illness is unique to everyone. The pain caused by it has a threshold tailored differently for every individual. It’s not always as we love to put it; irrational and eccentric behavior of an emo teen.
I think what’s wrong with the society’s perception of suicide is that we tend to look for a single straightforward reason for that bold step. We forget that it’s basically all those little things along the way, as small and insignificant as they may seem to another, that pile up to become lethal for the mind to bear.
Hannah Baker was beautiful, smart and had an incredible sense of humor. For most people, these qualities are essential to life and yet Hannah took her life. I was reading a research analysis the other day and the results showed that the mental stress that an adult person in developed nations dealt with back in the 80’s equals roughly the same that an average teenager goes through today.
Hannah Baker was beautiful, smart and had an incredible sense of humor. For most people, these qualities are essential to life and yet Hannah took her life. I was reading a research analysis the other day and the results showed that the mental stress that an adult person in developed nations dealt with back in the 80’s equals roughly the same that an average teenager goes through today.
Let’s stop being judgemental for once. Let’s stop sizing up others’ potential capacity for depression. Let’s begin with admitting to the fact that there is no glamor in suicide. People do it only to end their misery. When they can no longer fight their internal war against emotional turmoils and conflicts. This attitude will help us keep our eyes open and keep a lookout for emotionally scarred people in need of help. The only way to stop suicide is to reach out. To listen to such people and maybe even help fill in a void and remove that loss of self-worth.
Sadly, with suicide, there always has to be an episode with a loved one that ignites the parents and the family to take initiative.
I’ll conclude with the relevant words of Atticus Finch from ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’;
You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view…until you climb inside of his skin and walk around in it.
P.S., my brother & I had similar views on this show, as I was relieved to find out afterward.

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